Eggs

Asparagus Souffle

asparagus-souffle
Eggs are the natural food to eat for an Easter celebration. Today we have eggs in the supermarkets all year long, but in fact, in the wild, eggs are seasonal. Birds don’t lay eggs during the winter because they may not survive the cold. So in times past, when everyone got their food from the land, the coming of spring was a time of celebration in part because eggs were again available.

For me, the most exalted celebration of the egg is to make a souffle. Here the egg becomes a delicately-flavored cloud that almost melts in your mouth.

Souffles are not difficult. I whipped this one up this morning. If you follow my instructions carefully, you can do it too.

If I were having guests for Easter brunch or dinner, I would serve this as the first course, for guests to enjoy alone on the plate. Just a celebration of springtime asparagus and the first eggs of spring. But I’m just eating them myself for my own enjoyment.

Just a few notes before the recipe:

* the recipe calls for cheese. I used parmesan, but you can use any cheese you like, or no cheese at all.

* usually shuffles call for wheat flour to make a roux of wheat and butter. I used a heaping tablespoon of arrowroot instead (you can buy it at any natural food store). It worked beautifully! Better than wheat. If you want to use flour, use 2 tablespoons.

* the standard recipe calls for milk. I substituted half cream and half water because it has fewer carbs. I think you can probably use any milk or milk substitute.

* you can also make this with any vegetable you like. Just follow the same directions.

Each souffle contains one egg, so it’s not really a whole meal. I just ate two for lunch. A nice salad would make a great accompaniment, or a pile of asparagus!

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Vanilla Frittata With Strawberries and Ricotta

vanilla-fritatta-strawberries-ricotta

I first made this in 2008 when I was living in San Francisco. Now that I live in Florida, February is the start of our strawberry season, so this is a good time for me to enjoy this for breakfast.

It would also make a great Valentine’s breakfast, as you can easily trim the strawberry slices around the top into a heart shape.

If strawberries are out of season, you can melt frozen strawberries and mash them into a little sauce for the top, but fresh is best.

Though vanilla in eggs sounds odd, it’s absolutely lovely and transforms the eggs into something special.

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Summer Morning Egg Salad

summer_morning_egg_salad

 

Usually I eat two pastured eggs for breakfast, just scrambled.

But now that it’s summer I wanted something different.

I love hard-cooked eggs, but don’t particularly want them plain all the time, nor do I want to go through the work of stuffing deviled eggs.

This morning I wanted eggs that were crisp and cool and summery…and that’s what I made.

I started with two perfectly hard-cooked eggs that were already peeled and cold and sitting in my refrigerator waiting for me. I put them in a flat bowl and mashed them with a potato masher.

I chopped a whole stalk of celery and a large green onion and parsley and tossed them in with the mashed eggs.

Then I added a couple of tablespoons of organic Greek yogurt and mixed it all together.

And sprinkled Himalayan salt, fresh ground black pepper, and crushed celery seeds on top.

What made it wonderful was the abundance of vegetables, particularly the cubes of crunchy celery. There was such a volume of vegetables that the yogurt and eggs were just there to hold the vegetables together, rather than the salad being primarily eggs with only a few bits of vegetables for flavor.

It was just so delicious. And perfect for a summer morning.

I’m going to make it again tomorrow.






Deviled Eggs

deviled-eggs

My father’s favorite food was deviled eggs, so I grew up eating them frequently. Our family recipe was just mayonnaise and sweet pickle relish (yes, sugar, sugar, sugar), but as I started making my own food choices, I found other delicious recipes.

I’m posting this recipe today in honor of the Spring Equinox tomorrow, and Easter coming up in two weeks. Eggs are traditionally the food of spring because birds in the wild don’t lay eggs in the winter. In ancient times, the coming of spring literally was celebrated with the gathering of new eggs from the nests of wild birds, a welcome food source after the barren days of winter.

My favorite way to make deviled eggs is to use plain yogurt instead of mayo (which gives it some tang and digestive microorganisms), crunchy celery, and green onions. Sometimes I add a few celery seeds or sprinkle with paprika.

So that’s the recipe I’ll give you here. But if you’d like, leave a comment and tell us your favorite way to make deviled eggs.

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The Perfect Hard-Cooked Egg—Every Time

hard-cooked-egg

I never liked hard-boiled eggs when I was a child. The whites were rubbery and the yolks green in the middle. I just couldn’t eat them unless my father made our family recipe for deviled eggs.

But then, about ten years ago I was on vacation in Nantucket, and we had lunch in a little restaurant. It was just a salad with hard-cooked egg, and it was so delicious I looked at it with wonder. The yolk was yellow, the white was soft. Where had this egg been all my life? It tasted divine.

And so began my search for how to make a hard-cooked egg.

Noticed I am not calling them “hard-boiled eggs.” No. It’s the boiling of eggs that make them rubbery and green.

The secret is to cook them without boiling them. This I learned from Julia Child in The Way to Cook.

But I wrote out my instructions for myself because to master this, I needed to figure out how best to make them in my own kitchen.

NOTE: For best results, use older eggs that are not fresh. The shells tend to stick to the egg when they are fresh from the hen.hard-cooked-egg

I never liked hard-boiled eggs when I was a child. The whites were rubbery and the yolks green in the middle. I just couldn’t eat them unless my father made our family recipe for deviled eggs.

But then, about ten years ago I was on vacation in Nantucket, and we had lunch in a little restaurant. It was just a salad with hard-cooked egg, and it was so delicious I looked at it with wonder. The yolk was yellow, the white was soft. Where had this egg been all my life? It tasted divine.

And so began my search for how to make a hard-cooked egg.

Noticed I am not calling them “hard-boiled eggs.” No. It’s the boiling of eggs that make them rubbery and green.

The secret is to cook them without boiling them. This I learned from Julia Child in The Way to Cook.

But I wrote out my instructions for myself because to master this, I needed to figure out how best to make them in my own kitchen.

NOTE: For best results, use older eggs that are not fresh. The shells tend to stick to the egg when they are fresh from the hen.

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Sweet Potato Scrambled Eggs—My Favorite Breakfast

eggs-sweet-potatoes

This is one of those dishes that is just perfect in every way. I love it so much I can wait to have it be breakfast so I can eat it! It contains carbs for quick energy, protein for longer stamina, and fat to last until lunch. I have energy to work all morning.

It’s so simple and takes about five minutes to make in the morning. But it requires some prep.

There are two things you need to make in advance:

  •  baked sweet potatoes, baked to the degree that they are cooked but still have firmness, not baked until they are soft and sweet.
  • ghee, which works better than butter for this (but you could use butter too).

Since these are now staple foods for me, I just make them as needed and have them waiting for me.

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Egg Muffins

I decided to try Dr Kellyann’s recipe for Egg Muffins, which is one of the recipes included in the 30 Day Reset Diet.
I’ve seen similar recipes in the past, but wanted to try hers specifically because usually these “mini-quiches” contain dairy in the form of cream or milk and cheese.
The method is simple. You just place some “additions” in a muffin cup, add beaten egg, and bake at 350 degrees F for 20 minutes (it was 30 minutes in my oven, which I think is cooler than it should be). How much egg? It’s about an egg per muffin, but I just beat up a dozen eggs in the blender and distributed them across the 12 muffin cups, making sure to cover the additions in each one.
Dr Kellyann’s recipe calls for adding ground breakfast sausage, and sauteed red peppers and onions. I didn’t have a red pepper, but I had tomatoes, so I used those instead.
And they were delicious.
The good news is that you can make them in advance and they are great hot or cold. This morning I needed to run off to an appointment and just grabbed a couple and ate them in the car. I could stay on the program because I was prepared with perfect foods waiting for me in the refrigerator.
The bad new is that I made them with muffin papers, which stuck to the eggs. So you really do need to grease the cups with coconut oil first.
I’m making more this afternoon.

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